[ Read Online Lotusland ✓ american-revolution PDF ] by David Joiner ↠´ adbam.co.uk

[ Read Online Lotusland ✓ american-revolution PDF ] by David Joiner ↠´ This was a really engaging and well written book This book focuses on two American males and two Vietnamese females, all living in Vietnam As an American expat myself, I found the two main American characters to be incredibly realistic in the way they acted, their views of Vietnam and Vietnamese, etc The thing that really struck me though was how incredibly self centered all four of these characters were I don t know that there was a single moment in the book when any of those four characters did anything that wasn t going to directly benefit themselves There are moments when it appears one character is doing something nice, such as loaning money, helping apply for a visa, etc.
, but it always comes back to a selfish motivation Even when one of the American characters visits a hospital of Agent Orange victims, he only appears to want to write about them to further his career as a journalist.
Overall an interesting read, but please know that there are lots of expats that actually love and care about the countries they are living in Even American expats.
The Lives Of Two American Friends In Vietnam Diverge Sharply When One Chooses The Path Of A Writer And The Other Strikes It Rich In Real Estate Their Lives Further Conflict When They Find Themselves Clashing Over The Vietnamese Women They Ve Come To Love Really nice made me go through so many emotions I hate Nathan so much.
A well written story which explores the relationships between two expatriate American men living in Vietnam, both their relationships to each other and the local women they marry befriend.
One, a struggling writer who considers getting into the commercial business of his friend because he needs to make money , only too easily thwarted by a new relationship with a traditional lacquer artist and gallery owner Le, in the weeks before he should leave Saigon and move to Hanoi, where the business is based.
The other Anthony, now a successful business owner, husband and father of two children, though barely in control of his rapid success or family life, unsure whether he can rely on his friend, though he needs him for than just for work reasons.
The couples are like the escaped and the escapee, almost doomed from the beginning as they represent that often classic situation of the allure of a foreign culture, where the objective of the individuals are the opposite to each other despite the attraction.
It s an often painful, uncomfortable read as Joiner makes no excuses for his characters and we witness that selfish aspect of humanity in which every person appears to want something from the other and rarely puts the needs of the other before their own.
I particularly enjoyed how the author was able to evoke the sense of being in Hanoi, a city I adore and was quickly transported back to through his attention to providing a sense of place.
I was shocked to find myself at the final page, an abrupt ending that leaves the reader with much to think about and likely to provoke many interesting discussions about the mix of post war opportunity, life in foreign cultures, immigration and whether how it is possible to overcome the culture clash within a relationship.
My complete review here at Word by Word.
This was a really engaging and well written book This book focuses on two American males and two Vietnamese females, all living in Vietnam As an American expat myself, I found the two main American characters to be incredibly realistic in the way they acted, their views of Vietnam and Vietnamese, etc The thing that really struck me though was how incredibly self centered all four of these characters were I don t know that there was a single moment in the book when any of those four characters did anything that wasn t going to directly benefit themselves There are moments when it appears one character is doing something nice, such as loaning money, helping apply for a visa, etc.
, but it always comes back to a selfish motivation Even when one of the American characters visits a hospital of Agent Orange victims, he only appears to want to write about them to further his career as a journalist.
Overall an interesting read, but please know that there are lots of expats that actually love and care about the countries they are living in Even American expats.
Lotusland was my first NetGalley download and I was delighted to swiftly discover a literary novel of travel to exotic climes which perfectly suits my current reading bias.
Set in present day Vietnam, Lotusland tells the story of Nathan, a struggling American ex pat writer, who has been living in Saigon for several years He makes ends meet with various writing assignments and English teaching, but appears to have no real focus and is in a rut By contrast, the Vietnamese woman he meets, Le, has it all worked out She is an artist working in a gallery and has confidently applied for a visa to emigrate to America I enjoyed the different views of emigration and immigration which are presented in Lotusland Nathan tries to discourage Le s application by explaining the poor quality of life she could end up with as a Vietnamese woman in America His own life in Vietnam is hardly better, yet he does not or cannot see the similarities Despite his mastery of the language and however long he lives in the country, Nathan will never be Vietnamese as Le would not be American Joiner adds a third approach by introducing us to Anthony, another American, but one with a Vietnamese wife and children At first sight, Anthony is deeply integrated even than Nathan, but his is a lonely exile as he refuses to learn any of the native language thereby keeping himself aloof from his family and with Western business contacts in lieu of real friends His business struck me as pure Colonial arrogance, attempting to force Western capitalism and wealthy leisure pursuits onto a area of simple rural agriculture to satisfy his own vision of how Vietnam should be.
I was impressed that I became drawn into these three peoples lives as I did not find any of them particularly likeable, but I still wanted to find out what happens to them Nathan s could almost be a coming of age story He is initially pretty much a drifter, easily coerced and led Le is the most pragmatic of the three, finding her true path when her dream fails I was pleased that the details of traditional lacquer painting were included The passage slowed the pace of the story, but it was fascinating to read Likewise, Joiner s descriptions of Saigon and Hanoi, the train journeys and general life in Vietnam are well observed and created strong mental images for me His intimate knowledge of the country shines through in his writing.
Each chapter begins with the image of a lotus flower which is a nice touch I am not sure if it is a Kindle ism though, but the initial capital letter is then on a line of its own with the remainder of its word on the next line I had no trouble working out the text but the appearance is odd I can t say that Lotusland has inspired me to visit Vietnam in the same way as other novels have drawn me to their countries However, I think I now have greater understanding and appreciation The aftermath of the Vietnam War and the Agent Orange use are sensitively handled to induce sympathy, not pity, and I am left with an impression of a strong people in a beautiful country I will certainly be recommending Lotusland to friends who have previously visited as I think they will appreciate the memories called up by this story.
Lotusland was my first NetGalley download and I was delighted to swiftly discover a literary novel of travel to exotic climes which perfectly suits my current reading bias.
Set in present day Vietnam, Lotusland tells the story of Nathan, a struggling American ex pat writer, who has been living in Saigon for several years He makes ends meet with various writing assignments and English teaching, but appears to have no real focus and is in a rut By contrast, the Vietnamese woman he meets, Le, has it all worked out She is an artist working in a gallery and has confidently applied for a visa to emigrate to America I enjoyed the different views of emigration and immigration which are presented in Lotusland Nathan tries to discourage Le s application by explaining the poor quality of life she could end up with as a Vietnamese woman in America His own life in Vietnam is hardly better, yet he does not or cannot see the similarities Despite his mastery of the language and however long he lives in the country, Nathan will never be Vietnamese as Le would not be American Joiner adds a third approach by introducing us to Anthony, another American, but one with a Vietnamese wife and children At first sight, Anthony is deeply integrated even than Nathan, but his is a lonely exile as he refuses to learn any of the native language thereby keeping himself aloof from his family and with Western business contacts in lieu of real friends His business struck me as pure Colonial arrogance, attempting to force Western capitalism and wealthy leisure pursuits onto a area of simple rural agriculture to satisfy his own vision of how Vietnam should be.
I was impressed that I became drawn into these three peoples lives as I did not find any of them particularly likeable, but I still wanted to find out what happens to them Nathan s could almost be a coming of age story He is initially pretty much a drifter, easily coerced and led Le is the most pragmatic of the three, finding her true path when her dream fails I was pleased that the details of traditional lacquer painting were included The passage slowed the pace of the story, but it was fascinating to read Likewise, Joiner s descriptions of Saigon and Hanoi, the train journeys and general life in Vietnam are well observed and created strong mental images for me His intimate knowledge of the country shines through in his writing.
Each chapter begins with the image of a lotus flower which is a nice touch I am not sure if it is a Kindle ism though, but the initial capital letter is then on a line of its own with the remainder of its word on the next line I had no trouble working out the text but the appearance is odd I can t say that Lotusland has inspired me to visit Vietnam in the same way as other novels have drawn me to their countries However, I think I now have greater understanding and appreciation The aftermath of the Vietnam War and the Agent Orange use are sensitively handled to induce sympathy, not pity, and I am left with an impression of a strong people in a beautiful country I will certainly be recommending Lotusland to friends who have previously visited as I think they will appreciate the memories called up by this story.
Joiner is an excellent writer who doesn t waste a single word his spare, skilful prose paints a compelling picture of expat life in a fast changing Vietnam Lotusland is a story that will stay with you It s so beautifully written that you ll come to care about the characters even if you don t admire them The story follows the experiences of two very different American expat men in Hanoi The main character, Nathan, is an idealistic young writer who is determined to understand his new home In contrast, his friend Anthony is there to get rich quick He s married a local beauty and established a thriving real estate company.
When Nathan falls for Le, an intriguing Vietnamese lacquer painter, he s dismayed that she s eager to leave Vietnam because she feels she d have opportunities in America Anthony wants out too he feels trapped in a loveless marriage and can t even communicate with his own children.
The novel does a wonderful job of revealing the temptations faced by wealthy expats in poor countries and their moral decay Having lived in Vietnam for 20 years, I find most books by non Vietnamese authors set in Vietnam to be highly inauthentic Lotusland is an exception Joiner has produced a vivid and wholly believable portrayal of interconnecting lives in developing Vietnam.
Simply put, this is a great book I don t read novels all that often I m a periodical guy , but I have to say this one was a great read Not only was the story great, but the ideas and themes are poignant I think if you read this book you will see yourself in the characters and settings, regardless if you have been to Vietnam or not Just some preview it is set in Vietnam, involves a writer, real estate agent, painter, politics, relationships, and the search for who we are as people When great plots, characters, themes, and writing come together, can t help but turn the page Get yourself a copy or two You can get one or from.
com, or from Guernica Editions the publisher reading A canny look into the nature of the Western expat I was taken with the two characters, one who is making an effort to understand the country he is in, the other who is there to exploit it I have never seen the nature of being a privileged western expat portrayed so accurately or with such moral force The picture Joiner paints of Vietnam is also rich, complex, and haunting.
In this beautifully written novel, which evokes the exotic beauty as well as the seediness of Vietnam so well, David Joiner uses interwoven plots rather than the conventional plot and subplot to focus on trust in different kinds of relationships The story starts with an intriguing meeting between an enigmatic young Vietnamese woman, Le, and a young American writer, Nathan There is tension, both erotic and personal, between the two from the moment they meet, and Nathan finds himself rather reluctantly agreeing to Le s proposal that he help her apply for an immigrant s visa to the States, in return for being his girlfriend Cynical as this arrangement sounds, it is complicated by Nathan s deepening feelings for Le, and her elusiveness and secrecy, as well as her apparent reluctance to honor the terms of the agreement What s , Nathan has agreed to help his old friend Anthony, whom he owes a considerable sum, run his real estate company in Hanoi far away from Saigon, where Le lives So Nathan is torn between love and the promise he has given to his friend, between the desire to write and the need to make a living and perhaps above all, between the words people utter including himself and what they really mean If he has good reason to mistrust Le, Anthony has good reason to mistrust him As Joiner pushes his characters into predicaments in which, finally, they are forced to confront who they really are and what their friendships and loves are really worth, we learn a great deal about life in Vietnam a country I have not lived in but have visited with all its contradictions, corruption, and often heart rending beauty Particularly poignant and moving are Lotusland s fascinating evocation of Vietnamese lacquer painting and of the horrors of Agent Orange, the chemical weapon the US government used there during the war, which continues to cause suffering even today This is a big novel in scope, not simply a coming of age story about young people trying to find themselves in love and art and work, but equally the story of a country struggling to find its identity With prose reminiscent of James Salter s, with its taut lyricism, and themes of human corruption reminiscent of Graham Greene, and of eroticism reminiscent of Marguerite Duras, this novel truly belongs on a shelf with The Quiet American, The Lover, or Duong The Huong s Novel Without a Name In other words, it is a classic Highly recommended.
Lotusland is one of the few books on Vietnam that is written by an American, and offers fresh insights into contemporary Vietnam Ostensibly it s a love story about an idealistic young English teacher, Nathan who has who has fallen for a beautiful Vietnamese lacquer artist whom he suspects may just be using him to get a US visa But it is also a story about Nathan s deep love of a poor, much brutalized country that has suffered dearly at the hands of Americans, but despite that, is finally getting back on its feet largely because of them Like renowned American ex pat writer Paul Theroux, Joiner has a naturalistic style he s adept at creating atmosphere especially the stasis of the countryside in which farmers stood knee deep in the muck, like thin, stunted trees, fixtures in an unchanging landscape After several years of teaching, Nathan realizes that his life has become stagnant as well and he needs to take a leap When his wealthy American friend Anthony offers him a job selling estate to his newly rich clients, he reluctantly takes it on, all the time worrying if Anthony s authority and hunger for success would seep out invisibly and poison their private world The clash between Nathan s and Anthony s values create a second storyline in the book Despite Anthony s assertion that the upcoming generation just wants to forget about the Vietnam war, the past still lingers, particularly in the damaging effects of Agent Orange In one particularly harrowing scene, Nathan visits a hospital for children who have been affected by the chemical defoliant, a nightmarish nursery of cribs filled with armless, legless babies with heads swollen four times their normal size.
Ultimately Nathan and Anthony, like many ex pats, are bonded by the unsettling realization that the country they grew up in is now foreign to them And Nathan recognizes that there will come a time when returning to America will no longer be possible Most people he grew up with rarely left Ohio, much less American shores, and yet here he was, halfway around the world in a country that defeated America in war, where his skin, hair and eyes compelled people to treat him reverently one moment and subhumanly the next, and where his view of the world was so different from everyone else s If he was an exile, he d become one by choice A worthy read.
Beautifully written with characters that are interesting but realistic.
Really nice made me go through so many emotions I hate Nathan so much.

David Joiner was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio He attended Earlham College and majored in Japanese Studies During his junior year he made his first trip to Asia a five month study abroad program in Sapporo, Japan Nine years and several trips to Asia later he earned his MFA from the University of Arizona where he studied fiction, nonfiction, and playwriting He has been shuttling between